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What is Toradol and What is the Side Effects of Toradol ?

IMPORTANT WARNING:

Ketorolac Coupon - Ketorolac 10mg tablet

Ketorolac is used for the short-term relief of moderately severe pain and should not be used for longer than 5 days, for mild pain, or for pain from chronic (long-term) conditions. You will receive your first doses of ketorolac by intravenous (into a vein) or intramuscular (into a muscle) injection in a hospital or medical office. After that, your doctor may choose to continue your treatment with oral ketorolac. You must stop taking oral ketorolac on the fifth day after you received your first ketorolac injection. Talk to your doctor if you still have pain after 5 days or if your pain is not controlled with this medication. Ketorolac may cause serious side effects, especially when taken improperly. Take ketorolac exactly as directed. Do not take more of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

People who take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (other than aspirin) such as ketorolac may have a higher risk of having a heart attack or a stroke than people who do not take these medications. These events may happen without warning and may cause death. This risk may be higher for people who take NSAIDs for a long time. Do not take an NSAID such as ketorolac if you have recently had a heart attack, unless directed to do so by your doctor. Tell your doctor if you or anyone in your family has or has ever had heart disease, a heart attack, or a stroke or ‘ministroke;’ if you smoke; and if you have or have ever had high cholesterol, high blood pressure, bleeding or clotting problems, or diabetes. Get emergency medical help right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: chest pain, shortness of breath, weakness in one part or side of the body, or slurred speech.

If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking ketorolac. If you will be undergoing a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG; a type of heart surgery), you should not take ketorolac right before or right after the surgery.

NSAIDs such as ketorolac may cause ulcers, bleeding, or holes in the stomach or intestine. These problems may develop at any time during treatment, may happen without warning symptoms, and may cause death. The risk may be higher for people who take NSAIDs for a long time, are older in age, have poor health, or drink large amounts of alcohol while taking ketorolac. Tell your doctor if you take any of the following medications: anticoagulants (‘blood thinners’) such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven); aspirin; oral steroids such as dexamethasone, methylprednisolone (Medrol), and prednisone (Rayos); selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as citalopram (Celexa), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem, Selfemra, in Symbyax), fluvoxamine (Luvox), paroxetine (Brisdelle, Paxil, Pexeva), and sertraline (Zoloft); or serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) such as desvenlafaxine (Khedezla, Pristiq), duloxetine (Cymbalta), and venlafaxine (Effexor XR). Do not take aspirin or other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn) while you are taking ketorolac. Also tell your doctor if you have or have ever had ulcers or bleeding in your stomach or intestines. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking ketorolac and call your doctor: stomach pain, heartburn, vomit that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds, blood in the stool, or black and tarry stools.

Ketorolac may cause kidney failure. Tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease, if you have had severe vomiting or diarrhea or think you may be dehydrated, and if you are taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin, in Lotrel), captopril, enalapril (Vasotec, in Vaseretic), fosinopril, lisinopril (in Zestoretic), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon, in Prestalia), quinapril (Accupril, in Quinaretic), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik, in Tarka); or diuretics (‘water pills’). If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking ketorolac and call your doctor: swelling of the hands, arms, feet, ankles, or lower legs; unexplained weight gain; confusion; or seizures.

Some people have severe allergic reactions to ketorolac. Tell your doctor if you are allergic to ketorolac, aspirin or other NSAIDs such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), or any other medications. Also tell your doctor if you have or have ever had asthma, especially if you also have frequent stuffed or runny nose or nasal polyps (swelling of the lining of the nose). If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking ketorolac and call your doctor right away: rash; hives; itching; swelling of the eyes, face, throat, tongue, arms, hands, ankles, or lower legs; difficulty breathing or swallowing; or hoarseness.

Do not breastfeed while you are taking ketorolac.

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will monitor your symptoms carefully and will probably order certain tests to check your body’s response to ketorolac. Be sure to tell your doctor how you are feeling so that your doctor can prescribe the right amount of medication to treat your condition with the lowest risk of serious side effects.

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer’s patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with ketorolac and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm085729.htm) to obtain the Medication Guide.

Ketorolac is used to relieve moderately severe pain, usually after surgery. Ketorolac is in a class of medications called NSAIDs. It works by stopping the body’s production of a substance that causes pain, fever, and inflammation.

How should this medicine be used?

Ketorolac is used to relieve moderately severe pain, usually pain that occurs after an operation or other painful procedure. It belongs to the group of medicines called nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Ketorolac is not a narcotic and is not habit-forming. It will not cause physical or mental dependence, as narcotics can. However, ketorolac is sometimes used together with a narcotic to provide better pain relief than either medicine used alone.

Ketorolac has side effects that can be very dangerous. The risk of having a serious side effect increases with the dose of ketorolac and with the length of treatment. Therefore, ketorolac should not be used for more than 5 days. Before using this medicine, you should discuss with your doctor the good that this medicine can do as well as the risks of using it.

Ketorolac is available only with your doctor’s prescription.

This product is available in the following dosage forms:

  • Solution
  • Tablet

Ketorolac comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It is usually taken every 4 to 6 hours on a schedule or as needed for pain. If you are taking ketorolac on a schedule, take it at around the same times every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand.

How to use Toradol Tablet ?

Read the Medication Guide and, if available, the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start taking ketorolac and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Take this medication by mouth, usually every 4 to 6 hours with a full glass of water (8 ounces or 240 milliliters), or as directed by your doctor. Do not lie down for at least 10 minutes after taking this drug. If stomach upset occurs while taking this medication, take it with food, milk, or an antacid.

Dosage is based on your medical condition and response to treatment. To reduce your risk of stomach bleeding and other side effects, take this medication at the lowest effective dose for the shortest possible time. Do not increase your dose, take it more frequently, or take it for longer than 5 days. If you still have pain after 5 days, talk with your doctor about other medications you may use. Do not take more than 40 milligrams in a 24-hour period.

If you are taking this drug “as needed” (not on a regular schedule), remember that pain medications work best if they are used as the first signs of pain occur. If you wait until the pain has worsened, the medicine may not work as well.

Other uses for this medicine

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special precautions should I follow?

Other Medical Problems

The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of this medicine. Make sure you tell your doctor if you have any other medical problems, especially:

  • Alcohol abuse or
  • Diabetes mellitus (sugar diabetes) or
  • Edema (swelling of face, fingers, feet or lower legs caused by too much fluid in the body) or
  • Kidney disease or
  • Liver disease (severe) or
  • Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)—The chance of serious side effects may be increased
  • Bleeding in the brain (history of) or
  • Hemophilia or other bleeding problems—Ketorolac may increase the chance of serious bleeding
  • Bleeding from the stomach or intestines (history of) or
  • Colitis, stomach ulcer, or other stomach or intestinal problems (or history of)—Ketorolac may make stomach or intestinal problems worse. Also, bleeding from the stomach or intestines is more likely to occur during ketorolac treatment in people with these conditions

Before taking ketorolac,

  • tell your doctor if you are taking pentoxifylline (Pentoxil) or probenecid (Probalan, in Col-Probenecid). Your doctor will probably tell you not to take ketorolac if you are taking one or more of these medications.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention the medications listed in the IMPORTANT WARNING section and any of the following: antidepressants; angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin, in Lotrel), captopril, enalapril (Vasotec, in Vaseretic), fosinopril, lisinopril (in Zestoretic), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon, in Prestalia), quinapril (Accupril, in Quinaretic), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik, in Tarka); angiotensin receptor blockers such as candesartan (Atacand, in Atacand HCT), eprosartan (Teveten), irbesartan (Avapro, in Avalide), losartan (Cozaar, in Hyzaar), olmesartan (Benicar, in Azor, in Benicar HCT, in Tribenzor), telmisartan (Micardis, in Micardis HCT, in Twynsta), and valsartan (in Exforge HCT); beta blockers such as atenolol (Tenormin, in Tenoretic), labetalol (Trandate), metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL, in Dutoprol), nadolol (Corgard, in Corzide), and propranolol (Hemangeol, Inderal, InnoPran); medications for anxiety or mental illness; medications for seizures such as carbamazepine (Epitol, Tegretol, Teril, others) or phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek); methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall); sedatives; sleeping pills; and tranquilizers. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you more carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had the conditions mentioned in the IMPORTANT WARNING section or heart failure or swelling of the hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant; or are breast-feeding. Ketorolac may harm the fetus and cause problems with delivery if it is taken around 20 weeks or later during pregnancy. Do not take ketorolac around or after 20 weeks of pregnancy, unless you are told to do so by your doctor. If you become pregnant while taking ketorolac, call your doctor.
  • talk to your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking ketorolac if you are 65 years of age or older. Older adults should not usually take ketorolac because it is not as safe as other medications that can be used to treat the same condition.
  • you should know that this medication may make you drowsy or dizzy. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.
  • talk to your doctor about the safe use of alcohol while taking this medication. Alcohol can make the side effects of ketorolac worse.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor’s orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so.

The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the time allowed between doses, and the length of time you take the medicine depend on the medical problem for which you are using the medicine.

  • For oral dosage form (tablets):
    • For pain:
      • Adults (patients 16 years of age and older)—One 10-milligram (mg) tablet four times a day, four to six hours apart. Some people may be directed to take two tablets for the first dose only.
      • Children up to 16 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • For injection dosage form:
    • For pain:
      • Adults (patients 16 years of age and older)—15 or 30 mg, injected into a muscle or a vein four times a day, at least 6 hours apart. This amount of medicine may be contained in 1 mL or in one-half (0.5) mL of the injection, depending on the strength. Some people who do not need more than one injection may receive one dose of 60 mg, injected into a muscle.
      • Children up to 16 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Missed Dose

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule. Do not double doses.

Storage

Store the medicine in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Do not refrigerate. Keep from freezing.

What should I do if I forget a dose?

If your doctor has told you to take ketorolac regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Ketorolac may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • headache
  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • diarrhea
  • constipation
  • gas
  • sores in the mouth
  • sweating

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, or those mentioned in the IMPORTANT WARNING section, call your doctor immediately. Do not take any more ketorolac until you speak to your doctor.

  • fever
  • blisters
  • unexplained weight gain
  • shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • swelling in the abdomen, ankles, feet, or legs
  • yellowing of the skin or eyes
  • excessive tiredness
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • lack of energy
  • nausea
  • loss of appetite
  • pain in the upper right part of the stomach
  • flu-like symptoms
  • pale skin
  • fast heartbeat
  • cloudy, discolored, or bloody urine
  • back pain
  • difficult or painful urination

Ketorolac may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA’s Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

In case of emergency/overdose

In case of overdose, call the poison control helpline at 1-800-222-1222. Information is also available online at https://www.poisonhelp.org/help. If the victim has collapsed, had a seizure, has trouble breathing, or can’t be awakened, immediately call emergency services at 911.

Symptoms of overdose may include the following:

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • stomach pain
  • bloody, black, or tarry stools
  • vomit that is bloody or looks like coffee grounds
  • drowsiness
  • slowed breathing or fast, shallow breathing
  • coma (loss of consciousness for a period of time)

What other information should I know?

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

 

Brand names

This branded product is no longer on the market. Generic alternatives may be available.

An Overview of Side Effects Associated with Toradol

Just like with any other medication, there are side effects associated with Toradol, however it is not necessary that every patient who takes this medication experience the side effects. Some people show very good tolerance to Toradol. While some people develop side effects that are minor and do not need any treatment. Let us have a look at some possible side effects of Toradol.

Risk of various side effects depend on different factors like

  • Your general health status
  • your age
  • other health ailments you have
  • other medications that you are using
  • the amount of Toradol used

Common side effects

Other side effects that occur only in one percent of people using Toradol are

  • High BP
  • vomiting
  • sweating
  • itching
  • unwanted rash
  • pain at the injected area
  • constipation

Serious side effects

As with any other medication there are chances of some serious side effects of Toradol that need immediate medical attention and they are

  • Allergic reactions like swelling of body, face, wheezing, skin rash, blisters, breathing problems
  • intestinal or stomach problems like ulcers, bleeding or perforation
  • liver damage that leads to fatigue, nausea and yellowing of skin, excessive tiredness, whites of eyes
  • unwanted weight gain or fluid retention
  • kidney problems like kidney failure
  • congestive heart failure

As Toradol can lead to some life threatening effects contact your doctor immediately if you notice the following symptoms

  • vomiting blood
  • bloody nose
  • tarry, black tools
  • purple, red spots on skin

Rare side effects

As per the clinical studies, some of the side effects noticed occurred rarely with use of Toradol. These side effects were seen in less than one percent of patients. It is not easy to state the reason of these rare side effects as whether they occur because of the medication or there is any other reason behind it. These rare side effects are

  • weight gain
  • dry mouth
  • rectal bleeding
  • change in appetite
  • fainting
  • unusual thinking
  • hallucination
  • breathing problems
  • allergic reaction
  • vision problems like blurred vision
  • tinnitus
  • asthma
  • hepatitis
  • breathing problems

There are possibilities that you may observe some of the side effects while using Toradol out of many explained above or may be that you do not experience any of them. Well, it is not possible for your doctor to know in advance as which all side effects you are going to experience through a medicine that you never used before. Therefore let your doctor know if you experience any side effects and also inform your doctor if you notice anything that you feel is not usual or something which seems not to be right. Do not ignore any side effect that you notice as it can be a serious side effect too.

Toradol Drug Interactions

Although certain medicines should not be used together at all, in other cases two different medicines may be used together even if an interaction might occur. In these cases, your doctor may want to change the dose, or other precautions may be necessary. When you are taking this medicine, it is especially important that your healthcare professional know if you are taking any of the medicines listed below. The following interactions have been selected on the basis of their potential significance and are not necessarily all-inclusive.

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is not recommended. Your doctor may decide not to treat you with this medication or change some of the other medicines you take.

  • Aceclofenac
  • Acemetacin
  • Amtolmetin Guacil
  • Aspirin
  • Bromfenac
  • Bufexamac
  • Celecoxib
  • Choline Salicylate
  • Clonixin
  • Dexibuprofen
  • Dexketoprofen
  • Diclofenac
  • Diflunisal
  • Dipyrone
  • Droxicam
  • Etodolac
  • Etofenamate
  • Etoricoxib
  • Felbinac
  • Fenoprofen
  • Fepradinol
  • Feprazone
  • Floctafenine
  • Flufenamic Acid
  • Flurbiprofen
  • Ibuprofen
  • Indomethacin
  • Ketoprofen
  • Lornoxicam
  • Loxoprofen
  • Lumiracoxib
  • Meclofenamate
  • Mefenamic Acid
  • Meloxicam
  • Morniflumate
  • Nabumetone
  • Naproxen
  • Nepafenac
  • Niflumic Acid
  • Nimesulide
  • Nimesulide Beta Cyclodextrin
  • Oxaprozin
  • Oxyphenbutazone
  • Parecoxib
  • Pentoxifylline
  • Phenylbutazone
  • Piketoprofen
  • Piroxicam
  • Probenecid
  • Proglumetacin
  • Propyphenazone
  • Proquazone
  • Rofecoxib
  • Salicylic Acid
  • Salsalate
  • Sodium Salicylate
  • Sulfasalazine
  • Sulindac
  • Tenoxicam
  • Tiaprofenic Acid
  • Tolfenamic Acid
  • Tolmetin
  • Valdecoxib

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Abciximab
  • Acenocoumarol
  • Amiloride
  • Amineptine
  • Amitriptyline
  • Amitriptylinoxide
  • Amoxapine
  • Anagrelide
  • Apixaban
  • Ardeparin
  • Argatroban
  • Bemiparin
  • Bendroflumethiazide
  • Benzthiazide
  • Betamethasone
  • Betrixaban
  • Bivalirudin
  • Budesonide
  • Bumetanide
  • Cangrelor
  • Certoparin
  • Chlorothiazide
  • Chlorthalidone
  • Cilostazol
  • Citalopram
  • Clomipramine
  • Clopamide
  • Clopidogrel
  • Cortisone
  • Cyclopenthiazide
  • Cyclosporine
  • Dabigatran Etexilate
  • Dalteparin
  • Danaparoid
  • Deflazacort
  • Desipramine
  • Desirudin
  • Desmopressin
  • Desvenlafaxine
  • Dexamethasone
  • Diazoxide
  • Dibenzepin
  • Digoxin
  • Dipyridamole
  • Dothiepin
  • Doxepin
  • Duloxetine
  • Edoxaban
  • Enoxaparin
  • Eplerenone
  • Epoprostenol
  • Eptifibatide
  • Escitalopram
  • Ethacrynic Acid
  • Feverfew
  • Fluocortolone
  • Fluoxetine
  • Fluvoxamine
  • Fondaparinux
  • Furosemide
  • Ginkgo
  • Gossypol
  • Heparin
  • Hydrochlorothiazide
  • Hydrocortisone
  • Hydroflumethiazide
  • Iloprost
  • Imipramine
  • Indapamide
  • Inotersen
  • Lepirudin
  • Levomilnacipran
  • Lithium
  • Lofepramine
  • Meadowsweet
  • Melitracen
  • Methotrexate
  • Methyclothiazide
  • Methylprednisolone
  • Metolazone
  • Milnacipran
  • Nadroparin
  • Nefazodone
  • Nortriptyline
  • Opipramol
  • Paramethasone
  • Parnaparin
  • Paroxetine
  • Pemetrexed
  • Pentosan Polysulfate Sodium
  • Phenindione
  • Phenprocoumon
  • Polythiazide
  • Prasugrel
  • Prednisolone
  • Prednisone
  • Protein C
  • Protriptyline
  • Reboxetine
  • Reviparin
  • Rivaroxaban
  • Sertraline
  • Sibutramine
  • Spironolactone
  • Tacrolimus
  • Tenofovir Disoproxil Fumarate
  • Tianeptine
  • Ticagrelor
  • Ticlopidine
  • Tinzaparin
  • Tirofiban
  • Torsemide
  • Trazodone
  • Treprostinil
  • Triamterene
  • Trichlormethiazide
  • Trimipramine
  • Venlafaxine
  • Vilazodone
  • Vorapaxar
  • Vortioxetine
  • Warfarin
  • Xipamide

Using this medicine with any of the following medicines may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or how often you use one or both of the medicines.

  • Acebutolol
  • Alacepril
  • Atenolol
  • Azilsartan
  • Azilsartan Medoxomil
  • Benazepril
  • Betaxolol
  • Bisoprolol
  • Candesartan Cilexetil
  • Captopril
  • Carteolol
  • Carvedilol
  • Celiprolol
  • Enalapril
  • Enalaprilat
  • Eprosartan
  • Esmolol
  • Fosinopril
  • Irbesartan
  • Labetalol
  • Levobunolol
  • Lisinopril
  • Losartan
  • Metipranolol
  • Metoprolol
  • Moexipril
  • Nadolol
  • Nebivolol
  • Olmesartan Medoxomil
  • Oxprenolol
  • Penbutolol
  • Perindopril Erbumine
  • Pindolol
  • Practolol
  • Propranolol
  • Quinapril
  • Ramipril
  • Sotalol
  • Spirapril
  • Telmisartan
  • Timolol
  • Trandolapril
  • Valsartan

Other Interactions

Certain medicines should not be used at or around the time of eating food or eating certain types of food since interactions may occur. Using alcohol or tobacco with certain medicines may also cause interactions to occur. Discuss with your healthcare professional the use of your medicine with food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Posted in Ketoprofen, NSAIDs

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