Pain Relievers

Pain relievers are medicines that reduce or relieve headaches, sore muscles, arthritis, or other aches and pains. There are many different pain medicines, and each one has advantages and risks. Some types of pain respond better to certain medicines than others. Each person may also have a slightly different response to a pain reliever.

Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are good for many types of pain. There are two main types of OTC pain medicines: acetaminophen (Tylenol) and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Aspirin, naproxen (Aleve), and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) are examples of OTC NSAIDs.

If OTC medicines don’t relieve your pain, your doctor may prescribe something stronger. Many NSAIDs are also available at higher prescription doses. The most powerful pain relievers are narcotics. They are very effective, but they can sometimes have serious side effects. Because of the risks, you must use them only under a doctor’s supervision.

There are many things you can do to help ease pain. Pain relievers are just one part of a pain treatment plan.

Panic disorder

Causes

Panic disorder sometimes runs in families, but no one knows for sure why some people have it while others don’t. Researchers have found that several parts of the brain are involved in fear and anxiety. By learning more about fear and anxiety in the brain, scientists may be able to create better treatments. Researchers are also looking for ways in which stress and environmental factors may play a role.

Signs & Symptoms

People with panic disorder may have:

  • Sudden and repeated attacks of fear
  • A feeling of being out of control during a panic attack
  • An intense worry about when the next attack will happen
  • A fear or avoidance of places where panic attacks have occurred in the past
  • Physical symptoms during an attack, such as a pounding or racing heart, sweating, breathing problems, weakness or dizziness, feeling hot or a cold chill, tingly or numb hands, chest pain, or stomach pain.

Who Is At Risk?

Panic disorder affects about 6 million American adults and is twice as common in women as men. Panic attacks often begin in late adolescence or early adulthood, but not everyone who experiences panic attacks will develop panic disorder. Many people have just one attack and never have another. The tendency to develop panic attacks appears to be inherited.

Diagnosis

Panic attacks can occur at any time, even during sleep. An attack usually peaks within 10 minutes, but some symptoms may last much longer.

People who have full-blown, repeated panic attacks can become very disabled by their condition and should seek treatment before they start to avoid places or situations where panic attacks have occurred. For example, if a panic attack happened in an elevator, someone with panic disorder may develop a fear of elevators that could affect the choice of a job or an apartment, and restrict where that person can seek medical attention or enjoy entertainment.

Some people’s lives become so restricted that they avoid normal activities, such as grocery shopping or driving. About one-third become housebound or are able to confront a feared situation only when accompanied by a spouse or other trusted person.  When the condition progresses this far, it is called agoraphobia, or fear of open spaces.

Early treatment can often prevent agoraphobia, but people with panic disorder may sometimes go from doctor to doctor for years and visit the emergency room repeatedly before someone correctly diagnoses their condition. This is unfortunate, because panic disorder is one of the most treatable of all the anxiety disorders, responding in most cases to certain kinds of medication or certain kinds of cognitive psychotherapy, which help change thinking patterns that lead to fear and anxiety.

Panic disorder is often accompanied by other serious problems, such as depression, drug abuse, or alcoholism.These conditions need to be treated separately. Symptoms of depression include feelings of sadness or hopelessness, changes in appetite or sleep patterns, low energy, and difficulty concentrating. Most people with depression can be effectively treated with antidepressant medications, certain types of psychotherapy, or a combination of the two.

First, talk to your doctor about your symptoms. Your doctor should do an exam to make sure that another physical problem isn’t causing the symptoms. The doctor may refer you to a mental health specialist.

Treatments

Panic disorder is generally treated with psychotherapy, medication, or both.

Psychotherapy. A type of psychotherapy called cognitive behavior therapy is especially useful for treating panic disorder. It teaches a person different ways of thinking, behaving, and reacting to situations that help him or her feel less anxious and fearful.

Medication. Doctors also may prescribe medication to help treat panic disorder. The most commonly prescribed medications for panic disorder are anti-anxiety medications and antidepressants. Anti-anxiety medications are powerful and there are different types. Many types begin working right away, but they generally should not be taken for long periods.

Antidepressants are used to treat depression, but they also are helpful for panic disorder. They may take several weeks to start working. Some of these medications may cause side effects such as headache, nausea, or difficulty sleeping. These side effects are usually not a problem for most people, especially if the dose starts off low and is increased slowly over time. Talk to your doctor about any side effects you may have.

It’s important to know that although antidepressants can be safe and effective for many people, they may be risky for some, especially children, teens, and young adults. A “black box”—the most serious type of warning that a prescription drug can have—has been added to the labels of antidepressant medications. These labels warn people that antidepressants may cause some people to have suicidal thoughts or make suicide attempts. Anyone taking antidepressants should be monitored closely, especially when they first start treatment with medications.

Another type of medication called beta-blockers can help control some of the physical symptoms of panic disorder such as excessive sweating, a pounding heart, or dizziness. Although beta blockers are not commonly prescribed, they may be helpful in certain situations that bring on a panic attack.

Some people do better with cognitive behavior therapy, while others do better with medication. Still others do best with a combination of the two. Talk with your doctor about the best treatment for you.

Panic Disorder

Panic disorder is a type of anxiety disorder. It causes panic attacks, which are sudden feelings of terror when there is no real danger. You may feel as if you are losing control. You may also have physical symptoms, such asPhotograph of a woman with a headache

  • Fast heartbeat
  • Chest or stomach pain
  • Breathing difficulty
  • Weakness or dizziness
  • Sweating
  • Feeling hot or a cold chill
  • Tingly or numb hands

Panic attacks can happen anytime, anywhere, and without warning. You may live in fear of another attack and may avoid places where you have had an attack. For some people, fear takes over their lives and they cannot leave their homes.

Panic disorder is more common in women than men. It usually starts when people are young adults. Sometimes it starts when a person is under a lot of stress. Most people get better with treatment. Therapy can show you how to recognize and change your thinking patterns before they lead to panic. Medicines can also help.

Pelvic Pain

Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way of your daily activities.

If you’re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during sex. Pelvic pain can be a sign that there is a problem with one of the organs in your pelvic area, such as the uterus, ovaries, fallopian tubes, cervix or vagina. It could also be a symptom of infection, or a problem with the urinary tract, lower intestines, rectum, muscle or bone. If you’re a man, the cause is often a problem with the prostate.

You might have to undergo a lot of medical tests to find the cause of the pain. The treatment will depend on the cause, how bad the pain is and how often it occurs.

Phosphorous

Phosphorous is the second most abundant mineral in your body. And it relieves the burning sensation of tight, painful muscles by stopping the nerves from sending pain messages to the brain. It’s especially good at helping muscles rebound after a workout.

121786Phosphorus is a chemical element with symbol P and atomic number 15. As an element, phosphorus exists in two major forms—white phosphorus and red phosphorus—but because it is highly reactive, phosphorus is never found as a free element on Earth. With few exceptions, minerals containing phosphorus are in the maximally oxidised state as inorganic phosphate rocks.

The first form of elemental phosphorus to be produced (white phosphorus, in 1669) emits a faint glow when exposed to oxygen – hence the name, taken from Greek mythology, Φωσφόρος meaning “light-bearer” (Latin Lucifer), referring to the “Morning Star”, the planet Venus (or Mercury). The term “phosphorescence”, meaning glow after illumination, originally derives from this property of phosphorus, although this word has since been used for a different physical process that produces a glow. The glow of phosphorus itself originates from oxidation of the white (but not red) phosphorus — a process now termed chemiluminescence. Together with nitrogen, arsenic, and antimony, phosphorus is classified as a pnictogen.

Phosphorus is the second most plentiful mineral in your body. The first is calcium. Your body needs phosphorus for many functions, such as filtering waste and repairing tissue and cells.

Most people get the amount of phosphorus that they need through their daily diets. In fact, it’s more common to have too much phosphorus in your body than too little. Kidney disease or eating too much phosphorus and not enough calcium can lead to an excess of phosphorous.

However, certain health conditions (such as diabetes and alcoholism) or medications (such as some antacids) can cause phosphorus levels in your body to drop too low. Phosphorus levels that are too high or too low can cause medical complications, such as heart disease, joint pain, or fatigue.

What Does Phosphorus Do?

You need phosphorus to keep your bones strong and healthy, to help make energy, and to move your muscles.

In addition, phosphorus helps to:

  • build strong bones and teeth
  • filter out waste in your kidneys
  • manage how your body stores and uses energy
  • grow, maintain, and repair tissue and cells
  • produce DNA and RNA — the body’s genetic building blocks
  • balance and use vitamins such as vitamins B and D, as well as other minerals like iodine, magnesium, and zinc
  • assist in muscle contraction
  • maintain a regular heartbeat
  • facilitate nerve conduction
  • reduce muscle pain after exercise

Pain Relief Rub Products that contains Phosphorous

ror-ediwide

 

 

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a real illness. You can get PTSD after living through or seeing a traumatic event, such as war, a hurricane, sexual assault, physical abuse, or a bad accident. PTSD makes you feel stressed and afraid after the danger is over. It affects your life and the people around you.

PTSD can cause problems like

  • Flashbacks, or feeling like the event is happening again
  • Trouble sleeping or nightmares
  • Feeling alone
  • Angry outbursts
  • Feeling worried, guilty, or sad

PTSD starts at different times for different people. Signs of PTSD may start soon after a frightening event and then continue. Other people develop new or more severe signs months or even years later. PTSD can happen to anyone, even children.

Treatment may include talk therapy, medicines, or both. Treatment might take 6 to 12 weeks. For some people, it takes longer.

Pregabalin

Pregabalin, also known as β-isobutyl-γ-aminobutyric acid (beta-isobutyl-GABA), is a medication used to treat epilepsy, neuropathic pain, fibromyalgia, andgeneralized anxiety disorder. Its use for epilepsy is as an add-on therapy for partial seizures with or without secondary generalization in adults.

Common side effects include: sleepiness, confusion, trouble with memory, poor coordination, dry mouth, problem with vision, and weight gain.Potentially serious side effects include angioedema, drug misuse, and an increased suicide risk.

Pregabalin is a derivative of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a potent gabapentinoid. It is a close structural analogue of GABA (see GABA analogue), as well as of gabapentin, GABOB, baclofen, and phenibut. It is a ion channel modulator that has rapid analgesic, anticonvulsant, and anxiolytic effects. Pregabalin is acentral nervous system depressant that has potential for abuse. The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) placed pregabalin, including its salts, and all products containing pregabalin into Schedule V of the Controlled Substances Act (CSA).

Pregabalin was originally marketed as Lyrica and is marketed under a number of brand names worldwide. As of 2016 no generic version is available in the United States. In the United States it costs about 300-400 USD per month.

Pregabalin is an anticonvulsant and neuropathic pain agent. Exactly how pregabalin works is not known. It is thought to bind to certain areas in the brain that help reduce seizures, nerve pain, and anxiety. It is used to treat fibromyalgia or nerve pain caused by certain conditions (eg, shingles, diabetic nerve problems, spinal cord injury). It is also used in combination with other medicines to treat certain types of seizures. It may also be used for other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Do NOT use pregabalin if:

  • you are allergic to any ingredient in pregabalin

Contact your doctor or health care provider right away if any of these apply to you.

Why is this medication prescribed?

Pregabalin is used to relieve neuropathic pain (pain from damaged nerves) that can occur in your arms, hands, fingers, legs, feet, or toes if you have diabetes or in the area of your rash if you have had shingles (a painful rash that occurs after infection with herpes zoster). It is also used to treat fibromyalgia (a long-lasting condition that may cause pain, muscle stiffness and tenderness, tiredness, and difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep). Pregabalin is used with other medications to treat certain types of seizures in people with epilepsy. Pregabalin is in a class of medications called anticonvulsants. It works by decreasing the number of pain signals that are sent out by damaged nerves in the body.

How should this medicine be used?

Pregabalin comes as a capsule to take by mouth. It is usually taken with or without food two or three times a day. Take pregabalin at around the same times every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand.

Your doctor will probably start you on a low dose of pregabalin and may gradually increase your dose during the first week of treatment.

Take pregabalin exactly as directed. Pregabalin may be habit forming. Do not take a larger dose, take it more often, or take it for a longer period of time than prescribed by your doctor.

Pregabalin may help control your symptoms but will not cure your condition. It may take several weeks or longer before you feel the full benefit of pregabalin. Continue to take pregabalin even if you feel well. Do not stop taking pregabalin without talking to your doctor, even if you experience side effects such as unusual changes in behavior or mood. If you suddenly stop taking pregabalin, you may experience withdrawal symptoms, including trouble falling asleep or staying asleep, nausea, diarrhea, headaches, or seizures. Your doctor will probably decrease your dose gradually over at least one week.

Your doctor or pharmacist will give you the manufacturer’s patient information sheet (Medication Guide) when you begin treatment with pregabalin and each time you refill your prescription. Read the information carefully and ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions. You can also visit the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) website (http://www.fda.gov/Drugs) or the manufacturer’s website to obtain the Medication Guide.

Other uses for this medicine

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking pregabalin,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to pregabalin, any other medications, or any of the ingredients in pregabalin capsules. Ask your pharmacist for a list of the ingredients.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what other prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as benazepril (Lotensin, in Lotrel), captopril (Capoten, in Capozide), enalapril (Vasotec, in Vaseretic, Lexxel), fosinopril (Monopril), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril, in Prinzide, Zestoretic), moexipril (Univasc, in Uniretic), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril, in Accuretic, Quinaretic), ramipril (Altace), and trandolapril (Mavik, in Tarka); antidepressants; antihistamines; medications for anxiety, including lorazepam (Ativan); medications for mental illness or seizures; certain medications for diabetes such as pioglitazone (Actos, in Duetact) and rosiglitazone (Avandia, in Avandaryl, Avandamet); narcotic pain medications, including oxycodone (OxyContin, in Percocet, others); sedatives; sleeping pills; and tranquilizers. Your doctor may need to change the doses of your medications or monitor you carefully for side effects.
  • tell your doctor if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol, use or have ever used street drugs, or have overused prescription medications. Also tell your doctor if you have or have ever had swelling of the eyes, face, lips, tongue, or throat; problems with your vision, bleeding problems or a low number of platelets (type of blood cell needed for blood clotting) in your blood, or heart or kidney disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, or if you or your partner plans to become pregnant. Also tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding. If you or your partner becomes pregnant while you are taking pregabalin, call your doctor. Pregabalin has caused decreased fertility in male animals and birth defects in the offspring of male and female animals who were treated with the medication. There is not enough information to tell if pregabalin causes these problems in humans.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking pregabalin.
  • you should know that pregabalin may make you dizzy or drowsy. Do not drive a car operate machinery, or do other dangerous activities until you know how this medication affects you. Ask your doctor when you may do these activities.
  • do not drink alcohol while taking pregabalin. Alcohol can add to the drowsiness caused by this medication.
  • you should know that your mental health may change in unexpected ways and you may become suicidal (thinking about harming or killing yourself or planning or trying to do so) while you are taking pregabalin for the treatment of epilepsy, mental illness, or other conditions. A small number of adults and children 5 years of age and older (about 1 in 500 people) who took anticonvulsants such as pregabalin to treat various conditions during clinical studies became suicidal during their treatment. Some of these people developed suicidal thoughts and behavior as early as one week after they started taking the medication. There is a risk that you may experience changes in your mental health if you take an anticonvulsant medication such as pregabalin, but there may also be a risk that you will experience changes in your mental health if your condition is not treated. You and your doctor will decide whether the risks of taking an anticonvulsant medication are greater than the risks of not taking the medication. You, your family, or your caregiver should call your doctor right away if you experience any of the following symptoms: panic attacks; agitation or restlessness; new or worsening irritability, anxiety, or depression; acting on dangerous impulses; difficulty falling or staying asleep; aggressive, angry, or violent behavior; mania (frenzied, abnormally excited mood); talking or thinking about wanting to hurt yourself or end your life; withdrawing from friends and family; preoccupation with death and dying; giving away prized possessions; or any other unusual changes in behavior or mood. Be sure that your family or caregiver knows which symptoms may be serious so they can call the doctor if you are unable to seek treatment on your own.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.

What should I do if I forget a dose?

If you forget to take a dose and remember a few hours later, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Pregabalin may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

  • tiredness
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • dry mouth
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • constipation
  • gas
  • bloating
  • ”high” or elevated mood
  • speech problems
  • difficulty concentrating or paying attention
  • confusion
  • difficulty remembering or forgetfulness
  • anxiety
  • lack of coordination
  • loss of balance or unsteadiness
  • uncontrollable shaking or jerking of a part of the body
  • muscle twitching
  • weakness
  • increased appetite
  • weight gain
  • swelling of the arms, hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • back pain

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of these symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

  • blurred vision, double vision, or other changes in eyesight
  • hives
  • rash
  • itching
  • blisters
  • swelling of the eyes face, throat, mouth, lips, gums, tongue, head or neck
  • shortness of breath
  • wheezing
  • muscle pain, tenderness, soreness, or weakness, especially if it comes along with fever
  • chest pain

If you have diabetes, you should know that pregabalin has caused skin sores in animals. Pay extra attention to your skin while taking pregabalin, and tell your doctor if you have any sores, redness, or skin problems.

Pregabalin may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch) or by phone (1-800-332-1088).

What should I know about storage and disposal of this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.

In case of emergency/overdose

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.

What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body’s response to pregabalin.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Brand names

  • Lyrica®

Last Revised – 09/01/2009

Pregabalin (Lyrica) is an anticonvulsant drug derived from gabapentin, approved in the European Union and in the US in 2004. Currently, it has well definedindications:

  • Neuropathic pain.
  • Epilepsy in patients who have partial seizures that cannot be controlled with their current treatment.
  • Generalized anxiety disorder.

In June 21, 2007; the US Food and Drug Administration approved Lyrica as the first drug for the treatment of fibromyalgia, a year later duloxetine (Cymbalta) became the second.

On 23 April 2009, the European Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) adopted a negative opinion, recommending the refusal of an extension of indication that would include fibromyalgia treatment as a new indication for Lyrica.

Pfizer requested a re-examination of the opinion. After considering the grounds for this request,
the CHMP re-examined the initial opinion, and confirmed the refusal of the marketing authorisation
on 23 July 2009.

The CHMP was concerned that the benefits of Lyrica in fibromyalgia had not been shown in either the short or the long term. There were no consistent or relevant reductions in pain or other symptoms in the short-term studies, and the maintenance of Lyrica’s effect was not shown in the longer study. The Committee was also concerned that the safety and effectiveness of Lyrica had not been shown in patients from the EU.

Bottom line:

EMEA didn’t approve an extension of indication for Lyrica to include the treatment of fibromyalgia.

Other approved indications (neuropathic pain, generalized anxiety disorder, epilepsy) for Lyrica remain with no changes.

Pregnancy and Medicines

Not all medicines are safe to take when you are pregnant. Some medicines can harm your baby. That includes over-the-counter or prescription drugs, herbs, and supplements.

Always speak with your health care provider before you start or stop any medicine. Not using medicine that you need may be more harmful to you and your baby than using the medicine. For example, many pregnant women take prescription medicines for health problems like diabetes, asthma, seizures, and heartburn. The decision about whether or not to take a medicine depends on the risks and benefits. You and your health care provider should make this choice together.

Pregnant women should not take regular vitamins. They may have too much or too little of the vitamins that you need. There are special vitamins for pregnant women. It is important to take 0.4 mg of folic acid every day before you become pregnant through the first part of your pregnancy. Folic acid helps to prevent birth defects of the baby’s brain or spine.

Pregnancy and Substance Abuse

When you are pregnant, you are not just “eating for two.” You also breathe and drink for two, so it is important to carefully consider what you give to your baby. If you smoke, use alcohol or take illegal drugs, so does your unborn baby.

First, don’t smoke. Smoking during pregnancy passes nicotine and cancer-causing drugs to your baby. Smoke also keeps your baby from getting nourishment and raises the risk of stillbirth or premature birth. Don’t drink alcohol. There is no known safe amount of alcohol a woman can drink while pregnant. Alcohol can cause life-long physical and behavioral problems in children, includingfetal alcohol syndrome. Don’t use illegal drugs. Using illegal drugs may cause underweight babies, birth defects or withdrawal symptoms after birth.

If you are pregnant and you smoke, drink alcohol or do drugs, get help. Your health care provider can recommend programs to help you quit. You and your baby will be better off.

Prescription drug

A prescription drug (also prescription medication or prescription medicine) is a pharmaceutical drug that legally requires a medical prescription to be dispensed. In contrast, over-the-counter drugs can be obtained without a prescription.

The reason for this difference in substance control is the potential scope of misuse, from drug abuse to practicing medicine without a license and without sufficient education. Different jurisdictions have different definitions of what constitutes a prescription drug.

Procosa

USANA Procosa Joint and Cartilage Supplement (84 Tabs)

Procosa®

Tablets / Bottle: 84
Price: $36.25

Unique joint-support supplement with vitamin C and the InCelligence™ Joint-Support Complex

You can get 10% off if you register as a preferred customer and another 10% off if you place a recurring order.

Health Basics

  • Formulated with USANA InCelligence™ technology to unlock cell-communication codes with proprietary nutrient blends that activate your cells’ natural ability to protect and renew themselves
  • Blends the hydrochloride form of glucosamine with the potassium and magnesium sulfate included in the scientific formula of Procosa to provide the same benefits of glucosamine sulfate without using shellfish or other animal-based ingredients
  • Helps regulate normal cartilage formation by encouraging production of collagen and by acting as a building block for proteoglycans, which bind the water that lubricates and cushions the joint.
  • Supports joint function and comfort with Meriva® Bioavailable Curcumin—an innovative phytosome that is nearly 30 times more bioavailable than traditional curcumin preparations

The USANA Difference

Procosa supports optimal joint health so you can maintain an active lifestyle and do the things you love. The combination of glucosamine and Meriva in the InCelligence Joint-Support Complex helps to influence the signalling pathways that proactively promote an optimal immune and inflammatory response to restore normal function after exercise. It also helps activate autophagy to remove damaged organelles in joint tissue to support normal renewal of healthy joint-cell function and preserve healthy articular cartilage.

Bone and Joint Health

It’s easy to forget that bones are comprised of living tissue, with minerals being constantly deposited and withdrawn. In healthy adults, the rate of bone loss is roughly equal to the rate of bone gain. However, as we age, a deficiency of minerals can contribute to accelerated bone loss and ultimately osteoporosis. Our Bone and Joint Health supplements provide you with essential building blocks of healthy bones and joints.

Key Ingredients

Vitamin C, Turmeric Extract

You can get 10% off if you register as a preferred customer and another 10% off if you place a recurring order.

RECOMMENDED USE: HELPS TO MAINTAIN HEALTHY CARTILAGE. HELPS TO MAINTAIN JOINT HEALTH. /
USAGE RECOMMANDÉ :  AIDE À PRÉSERVER LA SANTÉ DU CARTILAGE ET DES ARTICULATIONS.
RECOMMENDED ADULT DOSE: TAKE THREE (3) TABLETS DAILY, PREFERABLY WITH MEALS. /
DOSE RECOMMANDÉE POUR ADULTES : PRENDRE TROIS (3) COMPRIMÉS PAR JOUR, DE PRÉFÉRENCE AVEC LES REPAS.
DURATION OF USE:
USE FOR A MINIMUM OF FOUR (4) WEEKS TO SEE BENEFICIAL EFFECTS.

DURÉE D’USAGE :
POUR CONSTATER DES EFFETS BÉNÉFIQUES, PRENDRE LE PRODUIT PENDANT AU MOINS QUATRE (4) SEMAINES.
EACH TABLET CONTAINS:
MEDICINAL INGREDIENTS 582.5 mg
VITAMIN C (CALCIUM ASCORBATE, 75 mg VITAMINE C (ASCORBATE DE CALCIUM,ASCORBYL PALMITATE) PALMITATE D’ASCORBYLE)
POTASSIUM (SULFATE) 31.43 mg POTASSIUM (SULFATE), NON-MEDICINAL INGREDIENTS: MICROCRYSTALLINE CELLULOSE, HYDROXYPROPYLCELLULOSE,CROSCARMELLOSE SODIUM, DEXTRIN, CALCIUM SILICATE, DEXTROSE, SOY LECITHIN,CARBOXYMETHYLCELLULOSE SODIUM, SODIUM CITRATE.

KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN PRIOR TO USE IF YOU ARE PREGNANT OR BREASTFEEDING. CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN PRIOR TO USE IF YOU HAVE A LIVER DISORDER, GALLSTONES, A BILE DUCT OBSTRUCTION, STOMACH ULCERS, EXCESS STOMACH ACID, OR IF YOU ARE TAKING ANTIPLATELET MEDICATION OR BLOOD THINNERS. CONSULT YOUR PHYSICIAN IF YOU ARE TAKING A PRESCRIPTION DRUG OR HAVE A MEDICAL CONDITION, OR IF SYMPTOMS WORSEN.

THERE IS A SAFETY SEAL UNDER THE CAP. DO NOT USE IF THE SAFETY SEAL IS BROKEN OR MISSING. STORE BELOW 25˚ C.

LABORATORY TESTED. QUALITY GUARANTEED. MEETS USP SPECIFICATIONS FOR POTENCY, UNIFORMITY, AND DISINTEGRATION, WHERE APPLICABLE. / TESTÉ EN LABORATOIRE. QUALITÉ GARANTIE. CONFORME AUX NORMES

*MERIVA® IS A TRADEMARK OF INDENA S.p.A. /

USANA HEALTH SCIENCES, INC., 3838 W. PARKWAY BLVD., SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH 84120 USA
DISTRIBUTED BY  : USANA CANADA COMPANY, 80 INNOVATION DRIVE, WOODBRIDGE, ONTARIO L4H 0T2
MADE IN USA
131.020103 LB.001062

You can get 10% off if you register as a preferred customer and another 10% off if you place a recurring order.

Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriasis is a skin disease that causes itchy or sore patches of thick, red skin with silvery scales. You usually get them on your elbows, knees, scalp, back, face, palms and feet, but they can show up on other parts of your body.

Some people with psoriasis have psoriatic arthritis. It causes pain, stiffness, and swelling of the joints. It is often mild, but can sometimes be serious and affect many joints. The joint and skin problems don’t always happen at the same time.

Your doctor will do a physical exam and imaging tests to diagnose psoriatic arthritis. There is no cure, but medicines can help control inflammation and pain. In rare cases, you might need surgery to repair or replace damaged joints.

1 2